Hey Girl. I Know You’re Moving Through Autonomy Toward Interdependence But Even Chickering and Reisser Couldn’t Do That Without Developing Mature Interpersonal Relationships

whatshouldwecallstudentaffairs:

OMG, best Hey Girl Ever.

Claim the word, and don’t let people use it to put more shame in the world. Be an ethical, honest slut, and enjoy pleasure and love. Chicago Slutwalk, June 4th!

Claim the word, and don’t let people use it to put more shame in the world. Be an ethical, honest slut, and enjoy pleasure and love. Chicago Slutwalk, June 4th!

(Source: interpretingtheindividual)

Still a dirty word…
ivanastab:

Print, copy, sticky-tape it everywhere!

Still a dirty word…

ivanastab:

Print, copy, sticky-tape it everywhere!

A nice Seussian rhyme to wrap up the message.
sparklysimonster:

true story and don’t ever forget it

A nice Seussian rhyme to wrap up the message.

sparklysimonster:

true story and don’t ever forget it

The Dreaded ‘Slut’

There is a rich debate going on about this, and a hell of a lot of gentle, thoughtful educating that we feminists have to do about why this is the perfect name and form for the protest - why the Slutwalk is an intellectually rigorous and brilliantly, satirically theatrical attack on a whole system of thought against women and queers and anyone else who can be dismissed with an ugly word like ‘Slut.’ Remember, Slut means whatever the speaker wants it to mean, so let’s take back the word, and take language-power away from those who would have you ‘behave’ in a certain way to avoid the dreaded ‘slut’ label.

The Though Catalog posts an ignorant but weirdly persuasive-in-a-creepy-way essay against the Slutwalk.

'The Funny Thing About the “Slutwalk” ' by Chelsea Fagan

Feministing destroys it.

'The Un-Funny, Unfair, and Un-Feminist Thing About Victim Blaming' by Chloe Angyal

Thought Catalog apologizes.

'We're So Sorry About the Funny Thing About The Slutwalk' by Ryan O'Connell

It’s not an easy or simple debate, is it? Can you imagine telling your mother that you’re going to the Slutwalk to protest Rape Culture? Maybe it’s easy for you, but it’s a complex conversation for many people I know.

hellokatiepilar:

stfuconservatives:

feministslut:

“It doesn’t have ANY effect on your life.What do you care? People try to talk about it like it’s a social issue. Like when you see someone stand up on a talk show and say “How am I supposed to explain to my child that two men are getting married?” …. I dunno,it’s your shitty kid, you fuckin’ tell ‘em. Why is that anyone else’s problem? Two guys are in LOVE but they can’t get married because YOU don’t want to talk to your ugly child for fuckin’ five minutes?” -Louis C.K.

Always, always, always warrants a reblog.

i just choked i laughed so hard. 

Louis C.K. = brilliant.

hellokatiepilar:

stfuconservatives:

feministslut:

“It doesn’t have ANY effect on your life.What do you care? People try to talk about it like it’s a social issue. Like when you see someone stand up on a talk show and say “How am I supposed to explain to my child that two men are getting married?” …. I dunno,it’s your shitty kid, you fuckin’ tell ‘em. Why is that anyone else’s problem? Two guys are in LOVE but they can’t get married because YOU don’t want to talk to your ugly child for fuckin’ five minutes?” -Louis C.K.

Always, always, always warrants a reblog.

i just choked i laughed so hard. 

Louis C.K. = brilliant.

(Source: thesoapboxschtick)

Jennifer Egan on her Reading Habits

fuckyeahladywriters:

“I usually get into bed with a novel and our Post-it-studded Times. I try to read the Times thoroughly and carefully at the end of the day. I’m fully aware that the news is two days old by then, and of course in certain areas I’ll be way ahead of it, but it’s the depth that I enjoy, and I find that it serves me well when the news isn’t fresh. The depth is twofold; on the one hand, I want to try to understand what’s going on, rather than just know what’s going on. On the other, I’m always trying to feed the unconscious part of me that’s scheming away—often without my conscious knowledge—at fiction writing. I never know what material that fiction writing part will end up needing or using, but I do like to let it chew through the Times on a daily basis. After I’m done with that, I read fiction. Reading fiction is purely fun for me—and luckily it’s also something that feeds the work I do. Yesterday I finished Meg Wolitzer’s The Uncoupling, which I thoroughly enjoyed, and I’m about to start Jessica Hagedorn’s Toxicology, which I’ve heard great things about. I think the last thing I read that got profoundly under my skin was Emma Donohue’s Room, which I read a couple of weeks ago. I thought about it as I read a news story (in the Times, of course!) about the guilty plea by that couple in California who kidnapped an 11-year-old girl, Jaycee Dugard, 20 years ago. They imprisoned her in the backyard and she had two daughters by her captor before she was discovered. Because of Room, I read the news story with a sense of resonant personal knowledge that I’ve never felt about those stories of captivity before. The feeling reminded me of why fiction is critical to me—more than nonfiction, and I say that as a journalist! Nonfiction expands my knowledge, but fiction broadens my experience. Reading the news story, I thought: I’m so glad to have read Room.”

Pulitzer Prize winner Jennifer Egan dishes on her media diet. Read the rest at The Atlantic Wire (via theatlantic)